Are "Executor Fees" allowed in Nova Scotia under the Probate Act?

Are "Executor Fees" allowed in Nova Scotia under the Probate Act?

Probate is the process by which a “Personal Representative” is formally appointed to have the authority to administer the estate of a deceased. The person appointed Personal Representative assumes the duty of gathering information about all of the assets of the deceased, (such as bank accounts, investments and property) paying the debts of the deceased out of the assets of the estate, and then and distributing the remainder of the assets among the rightful heirs, who are known as beneficiaries .

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Who Should I Choose as My Executor?

Who Should I Choose as My Executor?

In Nova Scotia, your Executor is the person you designate in your Will to be legally responsible for distributing your assets to the beneficiaries you name after you’ve died. They’re also technically responsible for handling your remains. It is a very important role with heavy financial consequences attached to it, as such it is important to select someone who is up to the task.

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What is an Executor and what are their duties and job?

What is an Executor and what are their duties and job?

When a person creates a Will in Nova Scotia the two main functions of the Will are to determine which assets each beneficiary will receive and to appoint the person who is in charge of following the instructions in the Will. The Executor is title given to the person whose job it is to follow the instructions in the Will.

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What do I have to do to before I draft my Will and Estate Planning Documents?

What do I have to do to before I draft my Will and Estate Planning Documents?

A common question we get when people contact us about starting the process of drafting their Will or estate planning is “What do I have to do before I come in?”  The short answer is nothing.  At our firm, when we help people with their estate planning we don’t require any sort of forms to be filled out in advance, nor do you have to compile a laundry list of bank account numbers or balances

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Appointing a Guardian for Minors

Appointing a Guardian for Minors

All children under the age of majority, which is 19 in Nova Scotia, require a legal guardian. This position is typically assumed by their parents. When one of the two parents die, guardianship of minor children is generally transferred automatically to the surviving parent. However, in circumstances where both parents have passed away, or the surviving parent is unfit to take on the role, guardianship will be determined depending on certain factors.

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