Shareholder Agreement

 The information and materials on this blog are provided for general informational purposes only and are not intended to be legal advice. Nothing contained on this blog is legal advice or constitutes a legal opinion. . While it is our goal to provide information which is current, legislative changes and court decisions, among other matters, may result in some information no longer being current or accurate. You should consult a lawyer before relying on any information. The views expressed herein by individual contributing lawyers posting entries to the blog are solely those of the authors and should not necessarily be attributed to or considered representative of the firm of Highlander Law Group Lawyers.

A business run by multiple partners through a corporation in which you are all shareholders should have a shareholder’s agreement. Yes, even if you are all friends or family. In fact, it is perhaps even more important in that case! Business ventures sometimes fail and even the closest of friends can fight over how a business is being run. A shareholder’s agreement allows you and your partners to agree on many contentious points in advance of any problems arising while cooler heads still prevail.

Your agreement can set out the role each shareholder is going to play in the company and how each person is to be compensated. It can define who will be officers of the company and who is responsible for day-to-day operations. Perhaps most importantly, it can determine the process by which the relationship between the shareholders can be ended if you are no longer able to work together.

These are only some examples of the many potential problems that arise between business partners in such closely held corporations. Without a shareholder’s agreement, such issues often need to be sorted out in court at great cost to the parties involved. The requirements for your shareholder’s agreement will depend on the nature of your business and the intended relationship between you and your partners.

Please feel free to contact us  if you think your business might benefit from a shareholder’s agreement. We would be happy to discuss this with you. You can call us at (902) 826-3070 to set up a meeting or contact us online.  You can also schedule a no commitment Issue Review Consult for $100+HST where you have the opportunity to explain your situation to a lawyer and get basic advice before deciding whether or not you'd like to retain us.

The information and materials on this blog are provided for general informational purposes only and are not intended to be legal advice. Nothing contained on this blog is legal advice or constitutes a legal opinion. . While it is our goal to provide information which is current, legislative changes and court decisions, among other matters, may result in some information no longer being current or accurate. You should consult a lawyer before relying on any information. The views expressed herein by individual contributing lawyers posting entries to the blog are solely those of the authors and should not necessarily be attributed to or considered representative of the firm of Highlander Law Group Lawyers.