Nova Scotia’s “Statute of Limitations” – the time limit for filing a claim in court

Nova Scotia’s “Statute of Limitations” – the time limit for filing a claim in court

Did you know there were time limits to file a claim in court? Well, there is! Depending on the type of claim you have, the amount of time you have to file can vary substantially. This period of time is called a “limitation period”. In Nova Scotia, the limitation period is determined by the type of legislation that your claim falls under. If the legislation does not set out a time period, then the Limitations of Actions Act will outline the time limits to follow.

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Understanding Damages in Personal Injury Cases in Nova Scotia

Understanding Damages in Personal Injury Cases in Nova Scotia

‘Damages’ is a term used to describe the monetary compensation awarded to victims of successful Personal Injury claims. They are calculated and granted by the court following the case. The Damages are an effort to reimburse the victim, as best as possible, for any losses suffered as a result of their injury. These losses could be economic, such as their ability to work for a period of time, or non-economic such as physical injuries. In conducting their calculations of the amount and types of Damages to award, the court asks itself what amount can help to put the victim in the same position they would have been had the injury not occurred.

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What Do Happens at my Nova Scotia Corporation's Annual General Meeting

What Do Happens at my Nova Scotia Corporation's Annual General Meeting

Incorporation is only the beginning of the process, corporations in truth require continuous attention. One important order of business a corporation is required to conduct is an Annual General Meeting or an “AGM”. A corporations governing legislation will set out the time frame within which an AGM is required to be held. According to both the Canada Business Corporations Act and the Nova Scotia Companies Act, an AGM is mandated to take place at minimum once a year

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What Does a Notary or Commissioner of Oaths Do?

What Does a Notary or Commissioner of Oaths Do?

Quite simply put, Notary Publics and Commissioner of Oaths are people who have been authorized by law to serve as an official witness to the signing of various legal documents. Notarizing a means that a Notary or Commissioner has taken the proper steps to verify your identity and then has witnessed your signing of a particular document. Afterwards they seal and sign the document to certify their witnessing of the signature. 

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